How many reasons are there to dismiss the current Dodger skipper??

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You make the call…

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120 thoughts on “How many reasons are there to dismiss the current Dodger skipper??

  1. I am not going to get into the reasons for firing or retaining Mattingly but clearly something needs to change. However, I have seen a lot of talk about the overpaid “prima donnas” on this team. Forgetting the overpaid part for a moment (after all, it is not the player’s “fault” a GM/owner agreed to these contracts), who are all these so called prima donnas? Does anyone think these players gave less than full effort or do not care about winning? I know Puig’s name comes up often but he was not even with the team for most of the season. Who else?

    Next let’s discuss all the defensive shifts. While defensive shifts have been a part of baseball for quite some time, we all know the trend exploded this season all over MLB, not just the Dodgers. Does anyone really believe Donnie all of a sudden became a big fan of these shifts? Did the team practice different scenarios of these shifts in spring training? Cory Seager was asked about working on shifts in the minors and he said not only did they not work on it, they don’t use them much. So who is responsible for the shifts? Clearly the front office stat geeks who somehow forced it down the line. As much as we may not like these shifts, until hitters can prove them useless, the shifts will continue. How many times did we see a hitter take advantage of the shift by bunting or hitting away from it? How many hits did these shifts take away?

    I also have seen a lot said about Donnie’s demeanor and that some ass kicking or shouting would help players. Really? In your workplace if the boss yelled at you or belittled you would that make you a better employee? I agree sometimes the boss may need to show some emotion and I am sure Donnie did at times but can you tell me that Bruce Bochy or Joe Maddon are screamers and show any emotion during a game? We have no idea what goes on outside the dugout. Perhaps Donnie does not have what it takes to get the most out of his players. All I know is Kershaw and others have publicly stated their support of Donnie.

    Finally, it seems to me when an organization decides to make a manager change that decision comes quickly after the end of the season. I think management had a difficult time deciding whether or not to keep Donnie after last season and will have the same difficulties this time. And remember Donnie made an issue out of not wanting to be a lame duck manager while Ned was still GM. And if the Dodgers do decide to replace Donnie, who is available (besides Roenicke) that would make you happy? And why would Roenicke be a better choice?

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    • Well spoken as always birk…

      This isn’t a desk job in a cubicle’d environment though. This is a blue collar, field job, that just so happens to pay very well. I myself have had jobs that the boss was high strung so to speak… and yes, eventually it wears on you…but that’s the point. Do the Armed Forces scream and yell to set the tone…Can you obtain a Special Forces patch without a little high spirited leadership?

      Maybe they can replace the old Bubble Machine with an Easy Bake Oven next season and Donnie can hand out fresh cupcakes when something good happens?

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      • ‘Cause Kapler would instill new leadership, younger leadership, on a team that is going to get younger in the future.
        ‘Cause Kapler is better suited for the type of baseball Friedman and crew are planning to instill in Los Angeles?

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  2. I hate to say it:

    The Dodgers sucked in the playoffs because they failed to get the guys they needed at the July 31st trading deadline. That’s not Donnie’s fault.

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  3. This is baseball – you don’t have to reason everything out, and I’ve had it with the analytics guys in the Front Office. Sometimes when the team doesn’t achieve what’s reasonably expected, you make heads roll to make the fans feel better. That’s all the reason you need to FIRE Mattingly and his entire staff. If the owners want to FIRE some people from the Front Office too, go right ahead – the more heads rolling, the better I’ll feel.

    Simple, no?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This thread has been up for over 4 hours now and I’ve given out more cupcakes than y’all have lameduck excuses to fire me…
    .
    2016 is gonna be the year of the Kerschwoobawoobawoobashaw!!!

    Schwuck on that!

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  5. Donnie left Every Day Dre on the shelf too often, and pissed off the #1 Dodgers fan – trublu4ever. That’s more than enough to get him fired right there.

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  6. I’m borrowing from a Forbes article on Donnie:

    “But he led the Dodgers to the postseason three straight years for the first time in history,” cries the apologist armed with a plethora of platitudes.

    Please.

    Walter Alston won Brooklyn’s only World Championship as a second-year manager in 1955, following-up to win three pennants in four seasons (1963, ’65, ’66) and three World Series in seven seasons (1959, ’63, ’65) after the club’s move to California. Tommy Lasorda won pennants his first two years at the helm (1977, ’78) and a championship in year five (1981).

    The object of the sport is not to win 300 games and appear in three postseasons, even if accomplished consecutively; it’s to win 33 games in three October opportunities, if you’re fortunate enough to get them. Bruce Bochy managed those 33 postseason wins in 2010, 2012 and 2014, each time with his San Francisco Giants the last team standing. Thirty-three. Mattingly has eight victories in three October attempts – eight – and October is what matters in L.A.”

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  7. Now as for myself, if the computer boys upstairs are calling shifts and dictating line-ups, then Donnie Boy will return, because the FO would rather have a manager as a co-equal of several working parts, and a pliable one at that. In Moneyball, didn’t Billy Beane dictate line-ups to Art Howe? This approach frightens me for the future: a collection of “captains” wallowing on the waves, none whom has absolute power. Lasorda was a hard-nosed leader and I doubt Campanis struck his nose into the on-field goings-on. If the future of the Guggenheim Dodgers is to create a conglomerate, multi-headed “managerial” beast (and the FO is filled to the brim with countless guys doing whatever, including Ned…hell, McCourt probably has a cubicle), is it any wonder Maddon didn’t wait around for a phone call? Or that Scioscia re-upped with the Angels so quick? Who would want to manage the Dodgers under these conditions? I sure as hell wouldn’t (though, admittedly, they haven’t call me as of yet). But one guy has NO PROBLEM with this approach. His name is Mattingly.

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  8. Not that I thought the TBS broadcast crew was pro Mets, especially against the Dodgers,
    but Ernie Johnson (lead announcer) said this when the Mets clinched the NLCS just now: “WE haven’t been to the World Series since 2000…”

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    • Weren’t the Mets in about as bad a shape as the Dodgers were when the Guggs took the helm???

      Didn’t they predict it would take years for them to get out of this hole???

      You know without the infusion of cash that the Dodgers had to their advantage…

      Who was the GM in Oakland before Billy Beane???

      Alderson signed a four year contract with a club option for 2015!

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